Oil extends gains after OPEC-led group seals deal to cut supply

CNBC

  • International Brent crude oil futures were at $62.21 per barrel at 0218 GMT.
  • Prices surged on Friday after the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and some non-OPEC producers including heavyweight Russia announced they would cut oil supply by 1.2 million bpd from January.
  • The booming U.S. oil industry is not taking part in the announced cuts.

Oil pumpjacks in the Permian Basin oil field are getting to work as crude oil prices gain.

Spencer Platt | Getty Images
Oil pumpjacks in the Permian Basin oil field are getting to work as crude oil prices gain.

Oil prices rose on Monday, extending gains from Friday when producer club OPEC and some non-affiliated producers agreed a supply cut of 1.2 million barrels per day (bpd) from January.

Despite this, the outlook for next year remains muted on the back of an economic slowdown.

International Brent crude oil futures were at $62.21 per barrel at 0218 GMT, up 54 cents, or 0.9 percent, from their last close.

Prices surged on Friday after the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and some non-OPEC producers including heavyweight Russia announced they would cut oil supply by 1.2 million bpd, with an 800,000 bpd reduction planned by OPEC-members and 400,000 bpd by countries not affiliated with the group.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were at $52.63 per barrel, up 2 cents, held back as the booming U.S. oil industry is not taking part in the announced cuts.

The OPEC-led supply curbs will be made from January, measured against October 2018 output levels.

“Our key conclusion is that oil prices will be well supported around the $70 per barrel level for 2019,” analysts at Bernstein Energy said on Monday.

Despite the cuts, that was still a price forecast reduction of $6 per barrel as Bernstein reduced its crude oil demand forecast from 1.5 million bpd previously to 1.3 million bpd for 2019.

U.S. bank Morgan Stanley said the cut was “likely sufficient to balance the market in 1H19 and prevent inventories from building”.

It added that it expected “Brent to reach $67.5 per barrel by 2Q19, down from $77.5 before.”

Oil prices have been pulled down sharply since October by signs of an economic slowdown, with Brent losing almost 30 percent in value.

Japan, the world’s third biggest economy and No.4 oil consumer, on Monday revised its third quarter GDP growth down to an annualized rate of -2.5 percent, down from the initial estimate of -1.2 percent.

Meanwhile the two world’s biggest economies, the United States and China, are locked in a trade war which is threatening to slow global growth and battering investor sentiment.

Despite the expectations of a slowdown, physical demand on the ground remains healthy.

China, the world’s biggest oil importer, over the weekend reported an annualized 8.5 percent jump in November crude imports, to 10.43 million bpd, marking the first time China imported more than 10 million bpd. That leaves the world’s second-biggest economy on track to set yet another annual import record.

Strong demand is being driven by Chinese purchases for strategic reserves, but also by new refineries, triggering excess supply of fuels, filling up storage tanks and eroding refinery profits across Asia.

US crude rises 2.2%, settling at $52.61, after OPEC and allies reach deal to cut output

CNBC

  • Oil prices jump after OPEC and its allies reach an agreement to slash production for the first six months of 2019.
  • OPEC producers agreed to cut output by 800,000 barrels per day, while allied nations including Russia will reduce production by 400,000 bpd.
  • The combined cut of 1.2 million bpd is in line with expectations and will take effect in January.

Here's the kind of deal OPEC could make

Here’s the kind of deal OPEC could make  

Oil prices surged higher on Friday after OPEC, Russia and several other producers reached an agreement to cut output next year in order to boost the market.

The new agreement comes at a time when the oil market is near the bottom of its worst price plunge since the 2008 financial crisis. Oil prices have dropped more than 30 percent from their highs in early October, hammered by concerns about oversupply, weakness in global markets and technical trading that exacerbated the slide.

OPEC and its allies agreed to throttle back output by 1.2 million bpd during the first six months of 2019.

The production cut is roughly in line with expectations heading into the meeting. Commodity watchers were expected the alliance to remove 1 million to 1.4 million bpd from the market.

Brent crude, the international benchmark for oil prices, rose $1.61, or 2.7 percent, to $61.67 a barrel. Brent earlier rose more than 5 percent to $63.73.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude futures ended Friday’s session up $1.12, or 2.2 percent, at $52.61 per barrel, off a session high of $54.22.

Energy research firm Wood Mackenzie forecasts the production cut will tighten markets by the third quarter of 2019 and cause Brent to rise back above $70 a barrel.

“It would help producers contend with the strength of US supply growth in 2019 when we expect a year-on-year increase of 2.4 million b/d in non-OPEC production as US supply continues to gain sharply,” said Ann-Louise Hittle, vice president of macro oils at Wood Mackenzie.

The United States is pumping at all time highs near 11.7 million bpd, according to preliminary government figures. Last week, the country exported more oil and refined fuels than it imported for the first time in decades.

Meanwhile, Russian production hit a post-Soviet era high at 11.4 million bpd this fall, and Saudi oil production rose to a record 11.1 million bpd in November.

The supply surge from the world’s top three oil producers is as forecasters warn oil demand growth will be softer than anticipated next year.

OPEC members agreed on Friday to cut production by 800,000 bpd, while non-OPEC producers aim to shave 400,000 bpd off the market.

Iranian oil minister confirms 1.2 million barrel oil cut

Iranian oil minister confirms 1.2 million barrel oil cut  

Top exporter Saudis Arabia will deliver the lion’s share of the OPEC cuts. Saudi Energy Minister Khalid al Falih on Friday said he expects the kingdom’s output to fall to 10.7 million bpd in December and 10.2 million bpd in January.

Russia’s pledge pencils out to a 228,000-230,000 bpd cut, Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak said. However, Novak warned that Russia would reduce supply gradually due to climate conditions that affect its oil fields in the winter.

OPEC began capping supply in partnership with Russia and several other nations in January 2017 in order to end a punishing downturn in oil prices.

The alliance reversed course and agreed to hike output in June after it removed more barrels from the market than it intended, largely due to the ongoing free fall in Venezuelan output and supply disruptions in Libya.

The Trump administration lobbied for the midyear production increase as it prepared to restore sanctions on Iran, a policy that has pushed up oil prices throughout much of 2018. Trump has sought to blame OPEC for rising oil prices, ordering the cartel to take action to cut the cost of crude several times this year.

On Wednesday, Trump tweeted that he hoped OPEC would not restrict supply and instead keep oil flowing “as is.”

Oil strengthens ahead of G20 meeting, but supply rise caps gains

CNBC

  • Oil prices ticked higher on Thursday on optimism that trade talks at the G20 meeting could aid the global economy and improve the demand outlook, while an increase in U.S. crude inventories to their highest in a year curbed gains.
  • U.S. crude futures rose 38 cents, or 0.8 percent, to $50.67 per barrel by 0338 GMT. The market ended the previous session down 2.5 percent at $50.29 a barrel, after hitting the lowest since early October last year.
  • International benchmark Brent crude rose 27 cents, or 0.5 percent, to $59.03 a barrel, having dropped 2.4 percent on Wednesday to $58.76 a barrel.

Oil prices ticked higher on Thursday on optimism that trade talks at the G20 meeting could aid the global economy and improve the demand outlook, while an increase in U.S. crude inventories to their highest in a year curbed gains.

U.S. crude futures rose 38 cents, or 0.8 percent, to $50.67 per barrel by 0338 GMT. The market ended the previous session down 2.5 percent at $50.29 a barrel, after hitting the lowest since early October last year.

International benchmark Brent crude rose 27 cents, or 0.5 percent, to $59.03 a barrel, having dropped 2.4 percent on Wednesday to $58.76 a barrel.

Both markets rose more than 1 percent in early Asian trade.

“We have seen huge increases in supply and the demand picture is in question. However, we might see some movement on global trade issues at the G20 meeting which starts on Friday,” said Michael McCarthy, chief strategist at CMC Markets and Stockbroking.

“I think we are seeing some positioning ahead of those potential demand-positive events.”

Investors in commodity markets are looking ahead to the meeting of leaders of the Group of 20 nations (G20), the world’s biggest economies, on Nov. 30 and Dec. 1, with the U.S.-China trade war at the top of the agenda.

U.S. President Donald Trump is open to a trade deal with China but is also prepared to hike tariffs on imports from the country if there is no breakthrough on longstanding trade issues during a dinner on Saturday with Chinese leader Xi Jinping, White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said on Tuesday.

Xi said China will widen market access for foreign investors and step up protection of intellectual property rights.

Meanwhile, rising supplies are keeping a lid on prices.

U.S. crude inventories for the week to Nov. 23 added 3.6 million barrels to the most in a year at 450 million barrels, exceeding expectations, the Energy Information Administration said on Wednesday.

“WTI oil is now trading right around the $50 per barrel level, a price last seen well over a year ago, as the current oversupply situation has now manifested itself in 10 consecutive weekly increases in U.S. oil inventories,” said William O’Loughlin, Investment Analyst at Australia’s Rivkin Securities.

The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and non-OPEC members will meet in Vienna, Austria on Dec. 6 to discuss a new round of production cuts of 1 million to 1.4 million barrels per day (bpd) and possibly more, OPEC delegates told Reuters earlier this month.

Oil bounces above $63 after slide, but glut worries persist

CNBC

  • American Petroleum Institute says U.S. crude oil inventories are falling.
  • Fearing a glut, OPEC pushes for a supply curb.
  • Trump support for Saudi Arabia makes oil supply cut harder, say analysts.

Oil bounced above $63 a barrel on Wednesday to claw back some of the previous day’s 6 percent plunge, lifted by a report of an unexpected decline in U.S. crude inventories.

The American Petroleum Institute (API) said on Tuesday that U.S. crude inventories last week fell by 1.5 million barrels, easing concerns for now that a supply glut is building up.

“The move yesterday was extremely sharp; after such moves you expect to have some rebound,” said Olivier Jakob, analyst at Petromatrix. “The API reported a stock draw – it is not a big one but at least it’s not a 10-million-barrel build.”

Brent crude, the global benchmark, was up 92 cents to $63.45 per barrel at 0944 GMT and traded as high as $63.67. U.S. crudegained 98 cents to $54.41.

Yet Wednesday’s bounce did little to reverse overall market weakness. Crude fell more than 6 percent in the previous session and world equities tumbled as investors grew more worried about economic growth prospects.

Brent has fallen by more than 25 percent since reaching a 4-year high of $86.74 on Oct. 3, reflecting concern about forecasts of slowing demand in 2019 and record supply from Saudi Arabia, Russia and the United States.

Worried by the prospect of a new supply glut, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries is talking about a U-turn just months after increasing production.

OPEC, plus Russia and other non-OPEC producers, is considering a supply cut of between 1 million barrels per day (bpd) and 1.4 million bpd at a Dec. 6 meeting, sources familiar with the issue have said.

Still, Saudi Arabia may find taking action to support prices harder, analysts say, given U.S. pressure to keep them low and President Donald Trump standing by the Saudi crown prince in the wake of the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Trump vowed on Tuesday to remain a “steadfast partner” of Saudi Arabia despite saying that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman may have known about a plan to murder Khashoggi.

“It is more difficult to expect a supply cut when you have the U.S. president giving full support to Saudi Arabia and asking Saudi to maintain low prices,” Jakob said.

Analysts at JBC Energy said Trump’s statement “highlights the potential for political fallout for Saudi itself from a hefty cut in production.”

Oil prices fall amid supplied market, Iran sanction exemptions

CNBC

  • Oil prices fell on Wednesday, extending losses from the previous session, with markets well supplied amid rising production and U.S. sanction waivers that allow Iran’s biggest customers to continue buying its crude.
  • Front-month Brent crude oil futures were at $71.85 per barrel at 0115 GMT, down 28 cents, or 0.4 percent, from their last close.
  • U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were at $61.76 per barrel, down 45 cents, or 0.7 percent, from their last settlement.

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David McNew | Getty Images

Oil prices fell on Wednesday, extending losses from the previous session, with markets well supplied amid rising production and U.S. sanction waivers that allow Iran’s biggest customers to continue buying its crude.

Front-month Brent crude oil futures were at $71.85 per barrel at 0115 GMT, down 28 cents, or 0.4 percent, from their last close.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were at $61.76 per barrel, down 45 cents, or 0.7 percent, from their last settlement.

The increasingly well supplied market has turned sentiment, which until early October was largely bullish, pushing Brent to four-year highs of more than $86 per barrel ahead of the Iran sanctions.

Brent and WTI have lost 17.4 and 19.7 percent in value respectively from their most recent peaks in early October.

U.S. bank J.P. Morgan said “part of the recent sell-off in oil was due to excessive crude in the physical markets…from elevated production from OPEC whilst Iranian supply was still in the market despite reduction in reported exports.”

Fawad Razaqzada, market analyst at futures brokerage Forex.com, said he had become “quite bearish on oil prices” due to lower demand growth forecasts, higher supply and Iran sanctions waivers.

According to Refinitiv Eikon data, Iranian crude exports have fallen to 1 million barrels per day (bpd) so far in November, down from almost 2 million bpd in October and around 3 million bpd in mid-2018.

U.S. bank Morgan Stanley said “oil market fundamentals have softened (as) supply continues to come in higher-than-expected, particularly from the U.S., Middle East OPEC, Russia and Libya.”

Output from the world’s top-3 producers Russia, the United States and Saudi Arabia, broke through 33 million bpd for the first time in October, meaning these three countries alone now meet more than a third of the almost 100 million bpd of global consumption.

Iraq, the second-largest producer within the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) behind Saudi Arabia, is targeting production capacity of 5 million bpd in 2019, up from 4.6 million bpd currently, Oil Minister Thamer Ghadhban said on Tuesday.

“The market is well supplied, and we see a balanced rather than tight market ahead. This no longer supports our $85 per barrel year-end and 1H19 forecast,” Morgan Stanley said.

Instead, the bank said it expected Brent to average around $77.5 per barrel to mid-2019.

With production rising, inventories are swelling.

U.S. crude stocks climbed by 7.8 million barrels in the week ending Nov. 2 to 432 million, data from the American Petroleum Institute showed on Tuesday.

Despite the well supplied market, Razaqzada warned that it would be “increasingly costly for inefficient producers to maintain output at current levels”.

Venezuela’s crude production was in “free-fall” and could soon drop below 1 million bpd, the International Energy Agency’s Executive Director Fatih Birol warned on Tuesday, down from the more than 2 million bpd it averaged last year.