Brent crude oil rises for a sixth day as supplies tighten amid strong demand

CNBC

  • Oil markets have been lifted by supply cuts led by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), but the potential of renewed U.S. sanctions against Iran is also pushing prices higher.

Brent crude oil rose for sixth day on Tuesday, passing $75 a barrel, on expectations that supplies will tighten because fuel is rising at the same time the United States may impose sanctions against Iran and OPEC-led output cuts remain in place.

Brent crude oil futures climbed to as high as $75.20 a barrel in early trading on Tuesday, the highest since Nov. 27, 2014. Brent was still at $75 a barrel at 0311 GMT up 29 cents, or 0.4 percent, from its last close.

Brent’s six-day rising streak is the most since a similar string of gains in December and it is up by more than 20 percent from its 2018 low in February.

Oil Russia

Sergei Karpukhin | Reuters

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were at $68.98 a barrel, up 34 cents, or 0.5 percent from their last settlement. On Thursday, WTI rose to as high as $69.56, the most since Nov. 28, 2014.

Markets have been lifted by supply cuts led by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) which were introduced in 2017 with the aim of propping up the market.

The potential of renewed U.S. sanctions against Iran is also pushing prices higher.

Stephen Innes, head of trading for Asia/Pacific at futures brokerage OANDA said new sanctions against Tehran “could push oil prices up as much as $5 per barrel.”

The United States has until May 12 to decide whether it will leave the Iran nuclear deal and re-impose sanctions against OPEC’s third-largest producer, which would further tighten global supplies.

“Crude prices are now sitting at the highest levels in three years, reflecting ongoing concerns around geopolitical tensions in the Middle East, which is the source of nearly half of the world’s oil supply,” ANZ bank said.

OPEC’s efforts to tighten markets are being led by top exporter Saudi Arabia, where state-controlled oil firm Saudi Aramco is pushing for higher prices ahead of a partial listing planned for later this year or 2019.

“Oil strength is coming from Saudi Arabia’s recent commitment to get oil back up to between $70 to $80 per barrel as well as inventory levels that are back in the normal range,” said William O’Loughlin, investment analyst at Australia’s Rivkin Securities.

OPEC’s supply curtailments and the threat of new sanctions are occurring just as demand in Asia, the world’s biggest oil consuming region, has risen to a record as new and expanded refineries start up from China to Vietnam.

One of the few factors that has limited oil prices from surging even more is U.S. production, which has shot up by more than a quarter since mid-2016 to over 10.54 million barrels per day (bpd), taking it past Saudi Arabia’s output of around 10 million bpd.

As a result of its rising output, U.S. crude is increasingly appearing on global markets, from Europe to Asia, undermining OPEC’s efforts to tighten the market.

Oil markets tense after western strikes on Syria, rising US drilling weighs

CNBC

  • Oil fell 1 percent on Monday as markets opened following western air strikes in Syria over the weekend.
  • Oil markets also came under pressure from a rise in U.S. oil drilling activity.

A pump jack and pipes at an oil field near Bakersfield, California.

Lucy Nicholson | Reuters
A pump jack and pipes at an oil field near Bakersfield, California.

Oil fell 1 percent on Monday as markets opened following western air strikes in Syria over the weekend, while a rise in U.S. drilling for new production also dragged on prices.

The United States, France and Britain launched 105 missiles on Saturday, targeting what they said were three chemical weapons facilities in Syria in retaliation for a suspected poison gas attack in Douma on April 7.

Brent crude oil futures were at $71.85 per barrel at 0547 GMT, down 73 cents, or 1 percent, from their last close.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were down 57 cents, or 0.9 percent, at $66.82 a barrel.

Traders said markets in Asia began cautiously after the weekend strikes, with some relief that the move looked unlikely to escalate.

“In the wake of the coordinated attack on Syria, oil prices are significantly lower … (but) the impact appears to be compact and over,” said Sukrit Vijayakar, director of energy consultancy Trifecta.

Oil markets also came under pressure from a rise in U.S. oil drilling activity.

U.S. energy companies added seven oil rigs drilling for new production in the week to April 13, bringing the total to 815, the highest since March 2015, energy services firm Baker Hughes said on Friday.

Despite this, Brent is still up more than 16 percent from its 2018 low in February, due to healthy demand and also because of conflict and tension in the Middle East.

Although Syria itself is not a significant oil producer, the wider Middle East is the world’s most important crude exporter and tension in the region tends to put oil markets on edge.

“Investors continued to worry about the impact of a wider conflict in the Middle East,” ANZ bank said.

Oil markets tense on Middle East crisis, US-China trade spat

CNBC

  • Oil markets remained tense on Thursday on concerns of a military escalation in Syria.
  • Prices were some way off Wednesday’s 2014 highs as bulging American supplies weighed.

Getty Images

Oil markets remained tense on Thursday on concerns over a military escalation in Syria, although prices remained some way off Wednesday’s highest since late 2014 as bulging American supplies weighed.

Ongoing trade disputes between the United States and China also kept markets on edge, traders said.

Brent crude futures were at $72.14 per barrel at 0536 GMT, up 8 cents, or 0.1 percent from their last close.

U.S. WTI crude futures were at $67.03 a barrel, up 21 cents, or 0.3 percent from their last settlement.

In China, Shanghai crude futures were also up, rising 8.9 yuan to 427.1 yuan ($68.03) per barrel, up 2.1 percent and with record volumes traded on the product that was only launched in late March.

Both Brent and WTI hit their highest since late 2014 of $73.09 and $67.45 per barrel on Wednesday, respectively, after Saudi Arabia said it intercepted missiles over Riyadh and U.S. President Donald Trump warned Russia of imminent military action in Syria.

“Geopolitical risks outweighed an unexpected rise in inventories in the U.S.,” ANZ bank said on Thursday.

Ongoing concerns of a prolonged trade dispute between the United States and China are also keeping markets on edge.

China lashed out at the United States on Thursday saying that the trade disputes, in which both sides have threatened to impose tariffs on imports of several products, were “single-handedly provoked by the U.S.” and that Beijing was prepared to escalate the spat if Washington did not back off from its threatened import tariffs.

The Chinese Commerce Ministry also said there had been no bilateral negotiations with the United States on the trade frictions.

Although markets are tense, supplies remain ample especially due to the United States.

U.S. crude oil inventories rose by 3.3 million barrels to 428.64 million barrels.

Meanwhile, U.S. crude oil production last week hit a fresh record of 10.53 million barrels per day (bpd), up by a quarter since mid-2016.

The United States now produces more crude than top exporter Saudi Arabia. Only Russia, at currently just under 11 million bpd, pumps out more.

“Barring any geopolitical shocks, we see limited upside potential for oil prices from current levels due to ongoing oversupply, mainly from the U.S. and Russia, and also a slowing demand growth outlook,” said Georgi Slavov, head of research at commodities brokerage Marex Spectron.

Oil prices firm, but trade dispute and Syria keep market on edge

CNBC

  • Oil markets stabilized after slumping around 2 percent last Friday.
  • Markets eyed the situation in Syria after reports – denied by the Pentagon – that U.S. forces had struck a major air base there.
  • Oil prices fell about 2 percent on Friday after U.S. President Donald Trump threatened new tariffs on China.

An oil pumpjack operates near Williston, North Dakota.

Andrew Cullen | Reuters
An oil pumpjack operates near Williston, North Dakota.

Oil markets stabilized on Monday after slumping around 2 percent last Friday on concerns over an intensifying trade dispute between the United States and China, as well as increased U.S. drilling activity.

Markets on Monday were also eyeing the situation in Syria after reports – denied by the Pentagon – that U.S. forces had struck a major air base there.

U.S. WTI crude futures were at $62.34 a barrel at 0355 GMT, up 28 cents, or 0.45 percent, from their previous settlement.

Brent crude futures were at $67.43 per barrel, up 32 cents, or 0.5 percent.

Oil prices fell about 2 percent on Friday after U.S. President Donald Trump threatened new tariffs on China, reigniting fears of a trade war between the world’s two largest economies that could hurt global growth.

With Chinese markets closed last Thursday and Friday, Shanghai crude futures played catch-up on Monday, dropping 0.6 percent to around 400 yuan ($63.43) per barrel.

“Oil prices have been susceptible to the brewing trade tensions between China and the U.S….However, fundamental support levels have been demonstrated with OPEC’s suggestion on an production limit extension into 2019,” said Singapore-based Phillip Futures.

Oil prices have generally been supported by healthy demand as well as by supply restraint led by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, which started in 2017 in order to rein in oversupply and prop up prices.

In physical oil markets, OPEC’s number two producer Iraq said on Monday that it is keeping prices for its crude supplies in May steady.

In the United States, drillers added 11 rigs looking for new production in the week to April 6, bringing the total count to 808, the highest level since March 2015, General Electric’s Baker Hughes energy services firm said on Friday.

As a result, U.S. exports have soared in recent months, “more than offsetting the Venezuelan supply disruption” as a result of the economic crisis in the South American OPEC-member, Innes said.

Oil markets mixed as US crude, Brent move in opposite directions

CNBC

  • Oil markets were split on Tuesday, with U.S. crude pushed up by reduced flows from Canada.
  • Traders said the higher WTI prices were a result of reduced flows from Canada’s Keystone pipeline.
  • Brent crude prices eased on Tuesday.

Getty Images

Oil markets were split on Tuesday, with U.S. crude pushed up by reduced flows from Canada while international Brent prices eased.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were at $62.38 a barrel at 0518 GMT, up 70 cents, or 1.1 percent, from their last settlement.

Traders said the higher WTI prices were a result of reduced flows from Canada’s Keystone pipeline, which has been operating below capacity since late last year due to a leak, cutting Canadian supplies into the United States.

Outside North America, Brent crude eased on the back of a dip in Asian stocks and a stronger dollar, which potentially curbs demand as it makes fuel more expensive for countries using other currencies domestically.

Brent crude futures were at $65.48 per barrel, down 19 cents, or 0.3 percent, from their last close.

The opposing price direction of the two main crude benchmarks has sharply reduced WTI’s discount to Brent, to around $3.22 per barrel on Tuesday, down from over $7 in late 2017.

Overall, oil markets remain well supported due to supply restraint by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), which started last year in order to draw down excess global inventories.

OPEC Secretary-General Mohammad Barkindo said on Monday the organisation registered 133 percent compliance with agreed output reduction targets in January.

Barkindo said compliance last year stood at 107 percent.

Global oil demand for 2018 is estimated to grow 1.6 million barrels per day due to an “encouraging environment”, Barkindo added.

Geopolitical risk has heightened as a factor in crude oil prices

Geopolitical risk has heightened as a factor in crude oil prices  

“OPEC and Russia continue to support the production cuts that are due to expire at the end of this year, and they assure markets that there will be an orderly ramp up of production once the cuts expire,” said William O’Loughlin, investment analyst at Australia’s Rivkin Securities.

While most of OPEC, especially its de-facto leader Saudi Arabia, is showing strong support for the production restraint, non-OPEC producer Russia has shown signs it may at some stage gradually start to increase output again.

Saudi Arabia – not least in an attempt to give the planned listing of its state-owned oil giant Saudi Aramco – a boost, is keen for Russia and other producers to keep withholding supplies to prop up prices.

But soaring U.S. production is threatening to erode OPEC’s efforts.

Last week, the amount of U.S. oil rigs drilling for new production rose for a fourth straight week to 798, in an indication that U.S. crude output, already at a record 10.27 million bpd, may rise further.

The United States late last year became the world’s second biggest oil producers, only slightly behind Russia and ahead of top exporter Saudi Arabia.