Oil comes off lows as hopes of OPEC cut, stimulus counter virus gloom

CNBC

Reuters
KEY POINTS
  • Brent crude was at $51.31 a barrel, up $1.64 or 3.3%, by 0502 GMT, off $48.40, the lowest since July 2017.
  • Across the Atlantic, U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude hit a 14-month low of $43.32, before recovering to $46.11, up $1.35, or 3%.
GP: Oil production facilities 200205 ASIA
A kayaker passes in front of an offshore oil platform in the Guanabara Bay in Niteroi, Brazil, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020.
Dado Galdieri | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Oil prices rebounded more than $1 a barrel after earlier hitting multi-year lows on Monday, as hopes of a deeper cut in output by OPEC and stimulus from central banks countered worries about damage to demand from the coronavirus outbreak.

Brent crude was at $51.31 a barrel, up $1.64 or 3.3%, by 0502 GMT, off $48.40, the lowest since July 2017.

Across the Atlantic, U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude hit a 14-month low of $43.32, before recovering to $46.11, up $1.35, or 3%.

Both marked their first gain after six sessions of losses amid virus worries. The coronavirus, which originated in China, has killed nearly 3,000 and roiled global markets as investors brace for a steep knock to world growth. Equities marked their biggest rout since the 2008 financial crisis last week.

Dragging on oil prices earlier in the day was data unveiled over the weekend by China, the world’s top energy consumer.

Factory activity in the country shrank at the fastest pace ever in February, underscoring the colossal damage from the outbreak on its economy.

“On the one hand, it’s pretty negative on worldwide crude oil and product demand,” said Lachlan Shaw, head of commodity research at the National Australia Bank.

But then there is news Saudi Arabia is pushing for a million barrels per day cut to be agreed this week, while central banks are increasingly signalling an appetite to intervene and support markets by cutting interest rates, he said.

“So it’s a balance and it’s going to be pretty volatile.”

Several key members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) are mulling the additional production cut in the second quarter amid fears the virus outbreak will erode oil demand. The previous proposal was for an additional output cut of 600,000 bpd.

Oil prices are down more than 20% since the start of the year despite OPEC and its allies including Russia, a grouping known as OPEC+, curbing oil output by 1.7 million bpd under a deal that runs to the end of March.

“Inaction by OPEC+ would likely trigger another potentially severe bout of selling,” analysts at Fitch Solutions have said.

Also, current prices would incentivize Russia to agree to further output cuts although “any cut will likely be of a short duration, for example, three months, with the barrels brought immediately back to market thereafter,” Fitch analysts said.

Oil prices rise ahead of trade deal, likely stock draw

CNBC

Reuters
KEY POINTS
  • Brent crude was up 16 cents, or 0.3%, at $64.36 per barrel by 0301 GMT after falling 1% on Monday. U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude futures were up 13 cents, or 0.2%, at $58.21 a barrel.
  • However, price gains were capped by receding Middle East tensions, with both Tehran and Washington desisting from any further escalation after this month’s clashes.
  • Elsewhere, Saudi Arabia’s energy minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said his country will work for oil market stability at a time of heightened U.S.-Iranian tension and wants to see sustainable prices and demand growth.
GP: Aramco oil facility Saudi Arabia 190719
Aramco oil facility near al-Khurj area, just south of the Saudi capital Riyadh on Sept. 15, 2019.
Fayez Nureldine | AFP | Getty Images

Oil prices edged higher on Tuesday as investors focused on the signing of a preliminary trade deal between the United States and China, the world’s top oil consumers, and on expectations of a drawdown in U.S. crude oil inventories.

However, price gains were capped by receding Middle East tensions, with both Tehran and Washington desisting from any further escalation after this month’s clashes.

Brent crude was up 16 cents, or 0.3%, at $64.36 per barrel by 0301 GMT after falling 1% on Monday. U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude futures were up 13 cents, or 0.2%, at $58.21 a barrel.

“Oil prices are modestly rebounding, following four days of intense selling,” said Edward Moya, analyst at brokerage OANDA, pointing to trade-deal optimism and fading concerns over the U.S.-Iran conflict.

“Oil prices are tentatively rebounding after seller exhaustion kicked in as investors await the next developments on the trade front and as earnings season begins.”

Oil prices were supported ahead of the signing at the White House on Wednesday of a Phase 1 trade deal, which marks a major step in ending a dispute that has cut global growth and dented demand for oil.

Still, with traders already pricing in the signing of the deal, there is more downside risk to prices, said Michael McCarthy, chief market strategist at CMC Markets.

“Regardless whether the deal is signed, we might have a buy the rumours, sell the fact scenario unfolding,” he added.

Separately, U.S. crude oil inventories were expected to have fallen last week, a preliminary Reuters poll showed on Monday, helping to boost prices.

The poll was conducted ahead of reports from the American Petroleum Institute (API), an industry group, and the Energy Information Administration (EIA), an agency of the U.S. Department of Energy.

China’s crude oil imports in 2019 grew by nearly 10 percent from the previous year on demand growth from new mega-refineries, customs data showed.

Elsewhere, Saudi Arabia’s energy minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said his country will work for oil market stability at a time of heightened U.S.-Iranian tension and wants to see sustainable prices and demand growth.

Oil prices surged to their highest in almost four months after a U.S. drone strike killed an Iranian commander on Jan. 3 and Iran retaliated with missiles launched against U.S. bases in Iraq. But they slumped again as Washington and Tehran retreated from the brink of direct conflict last week.

Prince Abdulaziz said it was too early to talk about whether the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and its allies, a group known as OPEC+, would continue with production curbs set to expire in March.

Oil prices climb after Saudi oilfield attack, but recession worries drag

CNBC

Reuters
KEY POINTS
  • Brent crude was up 64 cents, or about 1.1%, at $59.28 a barrel at 0255 GMT,
  • U.S. crude was up 55 cents, or 1%, at $55.42 a barrel.
Reusable: Oil pump jack and pipes California
A pump jack and pipes at an oil field near Bakersfield, California.
Lucy Nicholson | Reuters

Crude oil prices rose on Monday following a weekend attack on a Saudi oil facility by Yemeni separatists and as traders looked for any signs that Sino-U.S. trade tensions could ease.

But price gains were capped by an unusually downbeat OPEC report that stoked concerns about growth in oil demand.

Brent crude was up 64 cents, or about 1.1%, at $59.28 a barrel at 0255 GMT,

U.S. crude was up 55 cents, or 1%, at $55.42 a barrel.

“Oil is benefiting from an overall optimism that we won’t see the doomsday trade war scenario and after a drone attack on oil and gas facilities in Saudi Arabia reminded markets geopolitical tensions in the Middle East are going nowhere anytime soon, ” said Edward Moya, senior market analyst at OANDA in New York.

A drone attack by Yemen’s Houthi group on an oilfield in eastern Saudi Arabia on Saturday caused a fire at a gas plant, adding to Middle East tensions, but state-run Saudi Aramco said oil production was not affected.

Meanwhile, White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said trade deputies from the United States and China would speak within 10 days and could advance negotiations over ending a trade battle between the two countries if those talks pan out.

But U.S. President Donald Trump appeared less optimistic than his aides on striking a trade deal with China, saying that while he believed Beijing was ready to come to an agreement, “I’m not ready to make a deal yet.”

Concerns about an economic recession continued to weigh on crude prices even as Trump and top White House officials dismissed concerns that U.S. economic growth may be faltering.

Elsewhere, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) cut its forecast for global oil demand growth in 2019 by 40,000 barrels per day (bpd) to 1.10 million bpd and indicated the market would be in slight surplus in 2020.

It is rare for OPEC to give a bearish forward view on the market.

Also weighing on prices, U.S. energy firms this week increased the number of oil rigs operating for the first time in seven weeks despite plans by most producers to cut spending on new drilling this year.

Traders will also be looking out for key manufacturing data due later this week from Europe and the United States, said Michael McCarthy, chief market strategist, CMC Markets.

Oil slides on rising US crude stockpiles, Saudi vow to keep market balanced

CNBC

Reuters

KEY POINTS
  • Brent crude futures were down 38 cents, or 0.5 percent, at $71.80 at barrel by 0219 GMT, having risen 21 cents on Tuesday.
  • U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures for July delivery were down 58 cents, or 0.9 percent, at $62.55. The June contract expired on Tuesday, settling at $62.99 a barrel, down 11 cents.
Reusable: Oil pump 150921
Getty Images

Oil prices fell on Wednesday after industry data showed an increase in U.S.crude inventories and as Saudi Arabia pledged to keep markets balanced.

Brent crude futures were down 38 cents, or 0.5 percent, at $71.80 at barrel by 0219 GMT, having risen 21 cents on Tuesday.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures for July delivery were down 58 cents, or 0.9 percent, at $62.55. The June contract expired on Tuesday, settling at $62.99 a barrel, down 11 cents.

The American Petroleum Institute (API) said on Tuesday that U.S. crude stockpiles rose by 2.4 million barrels last week, to 480.2 million barrels, compared with analysts’ expectations for a decrease of 599,000 barrels.

Official data from the U.S Energy Information Administration’s oil stockpiles report is due later on Wednesday.

Outside the United States, Saudi Arabia on Wednesday said it was committed to a balanced and sustainable oil market.

Saudi Arabia has been at the forefront of supply cuts led by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), of which the kingdom is the de-facto leader, which started in January and are aimed at reducing global oversupply that emerged in 2018.

Because of the cuts, Bank of America Merrill Lynch said crude output by OPEC and its allies fell by 2.3 million barrels per day (bpd) between November 2018 and April 2019. That has helped push up Brent crude prices by more than a third since the start of the year.

The bank said some of the cuts’ impact was offset by a slowdown in global oil demand growth due to trade tensions to just 0.7 million bpd in the fourth quarter of 2018 and the first quarter of this year, versus a five-year average of 1.5 million bpd.

Beyond market fundamentals, oil traders are eying the tensions between the United States and Iran.

U.S. President Donald Trump on Monday threatened Iran with “great force” if it attacked U.S. interests in the Middle East.

On Tuesday, acting U.S. Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan said threats from Iran remained high.

Tensions have risen since Trump re-imposed sanctions on Iranian oil exports to try to strangle the country’s economy and force Tehran to halt its nuclear program.

Oil weighed down by record Saudi output; markets await G20, OPEC meetings

CNBC

  • Record Saudi oil production pulled down crude prices on Tuesday amid cautious trading ahead of the G20 gathering that starts in Argentina on Friday and next week’s OPEC meeting in Austria.
  • International Brent crude oil futures briefly dipped below $60 per barrel before edging back to $60.10 per barrel at 0147 GMT, still down 38 cents, or 0.6 percent, from their last close.
  • U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were at $51.21 per barrel, down 42 cents, or 0.8 percent.

The Khurais oilfield operated by oil giant Saudi Aramco, about 160 km (99 miles) from Riyadh.

Ali Jarekji | Reuters
The Khurais oilfield operated by oil giant Saudi Aramco, about 160 km (99 miles) from Riyadh.

Record Saudi oil production pulled down crude prices on Tuesday amid cautious trading ahead of the G20 gathering that starts in Argentina on Friday and next week’s OPEC meeting in Austria.

International Brent crude oil futures briefly dipped below $60 per barrel before edging back to $60.10 per barrel at 0147 GMT, still down 38 cents, or 0.6 percent, from their last close.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were at $51.21 per barrel, down 42 cents, or 0.8 percent.

Saudi Arabia raised oil production to an all-time high in November, an industry source said on Monday, pumping 11.1 million to 11.3 million barrels per day (bpd) during the month.

Since their most recent peaks in early October, oil prices have lost almost a third of their value, weighed down by an emerging supply overhang and by widespread weakness in financial markets.

“The recent weakness seems … to have been driven by a wider impending sense of doom amidst weak equities, geopolitics, subsequent softening demand and increasing supply,” said Jack Allardyce, oil analyst at financial services firm Cantor Fitzgerald Europe.

Looking ahead, Allardyce said “a lot depends” on the outcome of the Group of 20 (G20) meeting in Buenos Aires where the United States and China are expected to address their trade disputes, and on a meeting of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC).

The leaders of the G20 countries, which make up the world’s biggest economies, meet on Nov. 30 and Dec. 1, with the trade war between Washington and Beijing top of the agenda.

OPEC will gather for its annual meeting at its headquarters in Vienna on Dec. 6, and the group will discuss its output policy together with some non-OPEC producers, including Russia.

In favour of low oil prices for consumers, U.S. President Donald Trump has put pressure on his political ally Saudi Arabia, OPEC’s de-facto leader, not to cut production.

Despite this, most analysts expect OPEC to start withholding supply again soon.

“Our base case is for OPEC+ members to see through the pressure from President Trump and concentrate efforts on curbing the current oversupply in the market by conforming to a new production cut agreement next month in Vienna,” said Japan’s MUFG Bank.

“If OPEC plus Russia cannot send a very strong message to the market, prices are poised to fall further, perhaps to Brent $50 per barrel and WTI of $40 per barrel or less,” Fereidun Fesharaki, chairman of energy consultancy FGE, wrote in a note to clients.

“The message must be decisive, firm, and the front must look fully united, to have any chance of slowly reversing the trend,” it added.